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Saturday, December 31, 2005

This and That Bloggettes:

These are little stuff that, were they to be published in an opinion journal or magazine, would have been called tidbits or snippets or finger-eat-readings. Of course, some of them are long enough to be merited an Order of Individual Blog Post honour! Since I have either dealt with them in individual blog posts in detail (as in the case of Saurav) or are not timely or critical enough to merit a full blog (yes, really, Orhan Pamuk case is getting a bit tiresome, dearie!. Or some are in the developmental phase that I would like to underline what's worth following on the international news radar. The earlier one, Oh Captain, My Captain! was the first of these bloggettes, as I would like to term them. Read on...

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Saurav Ganguly affair like Mohd. Azharuddin's, Ajay Jadeja's, Manoj Prabhakar's and much before that Mohinder Amarnath's and not too late in the past, Nayan Mongia's never seems to end. Of course, they can't end it. At least, the press wouldn't let it end. Else how do they fill up the space? Antickpix had remarked in the comments section to my previous blog on this topic that perhaps my article musta been reserved for after-Pakistan than now. After all, he feels that the purpose of my blog is defeated. Saurav is back! I don't think so. I still hold to my statement: Saurav must have opted out of the "Stake Your Claim" racket rather than making a huge hullabaloo about the whole thingie and meet Pawar and strengthen his case. My shout in the post was not about Ganguly's inclusion or exclusion from the team, but how a Loch-Ness is hiding inside More-ji! How past never seems to leave us Indian! Calcuttans may have gone on cracker-ing the celeb. My lowdown on the upshot of "Mission Saurav Inclusion" is this: Saurav must be pretty careful. By giving him a ticket to Pakistan, they have played an Azadi game. The Train to Pakistan is a veritable booby. How? Remember that 90s series where Kris Srikant was the Captain and he achieved what till then no one had achieved in recent memory! Square a series in Pakistan. And yet, when the Indians came back, he was not only stripped of captaincy, but axed from the team. Since then, the only couple of times Kris wielded the willow were 1) the Bi- and Multi-lateral over-35 ODIs and the recent Essilor Lens ad! And yet, another man who was equally dubious in the series, an erstwhile captain, opening partner in crime, the man who actually stole the Audi Car from Srikkanth in the 85 B&H WSC - inspite of not producing anything spectacular in individual matches to outshine Srikkanth or to actually do a Lara or Symonds or Pietersen or Lee or Warne to win any crucial match single-handedly - Ravi Shastri went on to be retained in the team. Because he was smart enough to play a dogged innings to wrap up a timely century to save his gluteus maximus. The same is going to happen to Saurav if he is not careful. How do you think Sachin survives these days? We have spoken about this in the L'Affaire Saurav article. My Ramp-up to this dope: Take Saurav's record against Pakistan. 7 Matches with 200+ runs at an average that is in the none too impressive 20s to warm the idiomatic cockle of the hearts! Actually it is a jathetic poke... er pathetic joke! And he has come at the expense of someone who survived the late 90-s and the beginning of this decade due to the clemency of his Dada! Saurav Dada has come in at the expense of Mohd. Kaif. And the other beneficiary of Saurav's munificence, Yuvraj, is preferred ahead of him! Dramatic Irony? Poetic Justice? Reasons enough Saurav must produce out of the world stuff. Stuff to claim back his opener slot in ODI; stuff enough to get back his patta for the 3-down slot; stuff big enough to whack the s**t out of the Frog Dance Moron of Indian Cricketing Chairmanship who goes on to say something very different each day about Saurav: alternately pandering and breathing pan masala spit. So, Saurav watch out. They are digging a bigger grave for you. As the Bard would say "Honor you at the trifles to Deceive you at the highest!" Time will tell whether Saurav is the Gladiator in the Arena or Kheema matter for Pindi Express - the man who Bends it Like No-one Else Can - Akthar! Or even Umar Gul, the latest Aquib Javed. It is the stuff of legend that Aquib Javed took about 70 odd wickets in ODI and 80% came against India, in Sharjah!

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Fernando Alonso: I remember this bloke about 4 years ago. His debut was with Minardi. There was this race where it was a do or die for David "the undying" Coulthard. What the heck! He was in the Championship race. And the Scot was getting frustrated. Try as he might, he could not overtake the minnow in front of him. And he was furious, shaking his helmet-ed head and his bunched up fist... getting furious at the marshals for not blue-flagging the car in front of him... radioing expletives to his team at the pits... Imagine what you would do if this happens for like 18 laps... and the guy in front of you wasn't even a top-10 runner... the guy was a debutant in a Minardi! Well, the young turk in front of him had other ideas. He was in the clear. Coulthard may be fighting for the championship, but as long as the former was not a backmarker to Coulthard, he had a right to defend his position. Well drubbed the gravel on the grass, upstart! That was Fernando Alonso. The year, I guess, was 2001. And 2 years later, he won his first Grand Prix at Hungaroring! and almost earned a hard-fought duel with Schumi at the Spanish Barcelona Grand Prix. The home-fans squealed in manic delight that day. And 2 more years later, this guy has shaken up the entire paddock area 2 further years in advance. Well, the news - for those not following F-1 world when there is no race - is Alonso has already signed up to move over to McLaren for 2007. And the 2006 season has not started. Would not start until another month or two! A lot of questions are being raised over this Paddock Poaching for Driver Line-up 2007 by Ron Dennis when there is no apparent need to. At least, Alonso-Dennis combo need not have announced it now. So if Fernando doesn't due to some reason win as many races in 2006 as he did in 2005 or cannot retain his Championship (there's already breaking news that Schumi has set early season testing times ablaze at Fiorano circuit), question marks are going to be raised. And what of Montoya or Raikkonen at McLaren. Is this Ron's way of shaking Kimi for not winning the Driver's Championship? Or is this a way of rattling Montoya who until the other day, before the emergence of Alonso out of Renault testing service, was the fieriest and angry young driver of F-1? So who goes out? Who stays in? A lot of commitments are going to be put to test in what seems a difficult year for F-1 : 2006!

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Breaking News on the F-1 front: Hockenheim in recent financial trouble is already the only true-blood German Grand Prix. Nurburgring, although technically is in Germany and even closer to Schumis' home-town of Kerpen than Hockenheim, is considered a European Grand Prix hosted by Luxemborg Racing Authorities and the State of Luxemborg. And those folks are adding salt to the already wounded pride of Hockenheimers by offering to sharing the financial burden. Internal German take-over? What with BMW stepping in directly into the ring! On that count, we have a new team for 2006. A Japanese team that is not Honda, not Toyota... Of course, Taku Sato is in the driver line-up with another newbie. All Jap line-up. Sony took over Hollywood. Will Japan take over F-1 too? Max! Bernie!! d'ye both hear? Or will, when he retires, Schumi be the hier-apparent to Max and Bernie's stranglehold on the business part of F-1? Already we hear this week that Luca di Montezemolo - the honcho at Fiorano (Ferrari Headquarters) - announcing that Schumi is Ferrari's eternal future, hinting that even after quitting competitive racing, Michael would be active either as Manager or as Technical Chief or whatever Michael desires. Good thing that Rubens has decided to move over at the long last! But sad thing, everyone who moves into Ferrari talks rose before taking the tack Eddie Irvine took 5 years back. Losers grumblers, eh? That's it from F-1 paddock this week. You can check my dedicated brand new blog Little Shop of Formoola One Musings for regular updates and more detailed and specialized posts!

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Johnny Depp: Since the day - about 8 to 9 years or even more - I first saw the movie Edward Scissorhands, I have never lost an opportunity to admire Depp's acting. Of late I have been analyzing his work style and subtle approach to handling roles, he never fails to amaze me. In my 30 years of movie watching, I guess, this is one fellow who has really made me spout sweeping statements. Just this day, after belatedly watching Finding Neverland, I realize Depp is the finest actor of this generation. I have been taken in goosebump zone by Val Kilmer's facility with varying choice of roles and the handling of them (Independence, Top Secret, The Doors, Batman...the list is long!). I have occasionally wondered at the a-la Zen calmness that Keanu Reeves brings to his approach to his roles; I have been occasionally (initially) misled to consider Di Caprio as a potential (nah! Not Titanic, but The Man in the Iron Mask), but I was pretty disappointed by his portrayal of the hyped Aviator movie. And so with Hollywood's true successor to the blue-eyed boy seat left vacant by Paul Newman - Tom Cruise. In spite of repeatedly forced into watching The Last Samurai, I conclude that his range is limited. Of course, now they are all talking Orlando Bloom and Jude Law and others of the ilk. And my friend Radio Krishna says Javier Bardoe and Ed Norton are gunning at Johnny's heels now, but Depp still beats them all by streets and autobahns. I have seen him now in Edward Scissorhands, Deadman (directed by Jim Jarmusch of the Coffee and Cigarrettes and more recently the Cannes 2005 winning Broken Flowers fame and on whom alongside Terry Gilliam I plan to post a blog shortly), Finding Neverland and a couple of other movies; and there is a certain silkiness of approach and subtlety of undertanding he brings to the characters he plays. Even a movie like Pirates of the Carribean (which incidentally stars Orlando Bloom alongside) an apparently comic role in a bravado cult movie-line, he brings so much to the role. He makes is all his movie. When it's a Johnny movie you are never out of Deppth!

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Kerry Packer: The last week has seen the biggest event of perhaps the most catastrophic year of this millennium heretofore! The cricketing moghul who turned the world upside down in the Rand-era by introducing the ODI World Series - otherwise eponymously known as the Packer Series until it was officially accepted as a game worth considering blood brother to Test Cricket - died at the age of 68. It was a watermark but very sweeping sad moment. How else would the world of Lance Kluseners and Jayasuriyas and Yuvrajs and Kris Srikkanths have survived, if not for this invention! The Kiwis have tried their own share of Max and 20-20 series... and they have failed to uproot the fascination a ODI has till now. Salute the Great Gatsby of Modern Cricket, Late Kerry Packer, ladies and gentlemen! I shall try and post a dedicated blog later to this genius. I guess, juxtaposed next to his contribution, Sir WG can take a flight to moon and get back leisurely (if he wants he can stay there. It ain"t windy up there!)

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Orhan Pamuk: It is getting a bit of tedium, this Case of Orhan "the Turk" Pamuk. The Turkish author - famed for his works My Name is Red, Snow, The Black Book et al. - perhaps the only of his ilk to have come from a bigoted and beleagured Turkey that is fashionably teetering on the edge of ambiguity vis-à-vis its entry into European Union membership, has been basking under the wrath of millions of fanatical Turks, who have been castigating him in all possible ways regarding his comments on the Turkishness of the National Turk Army (in a recent October interview to a German Press); who have been baying for his blood a-la Ayotollah for Rushdie's blood back in the 90s, for his apparent opinions upon the 1915-22 killings of 1.5 million Armenians and heck of a lot of Kurds at the hands of the Ottoman regime. First they went abuzz and paranoid and psychotic and mob-hysterical about his February comments to a Swiss paper about the Armenian alleged-Genocide. And then they issued some sort of a fatwa on him. Then they made a date for his trial in October. It was postponed.

They pushed it to December 16th. Now they have pushed it further to February. Grounds of adjournment and stay and postponement range from "non-availment of proper orders from the Justice Dept." to Outcry of the Western media. Ha! My Conspiracy Theory is this... I think, on a purely personal side it is turning out to resemble a purely sales-pitch by pro-Pamuk press and his retinue of small-scale industry (read publishers, agents and of the plumage) to keep him eligible for Booker, Nobel and whatnots. On the other hand, at a larger public scale it seems like an advertisement riot by the Turkish government to keep itself in the news constantly as the gather support for their membership. To project a "cry for freedom of expression" from media and artist community and then provide it (hopefully shortly) to a cued-timing, whereby the Western countries and the E.U member countries heave a sigh of relief; and Turkey can score a few brownies in its bid for EU membership. Of course, Greece is watching! They are not going to sit tight. As I write this, I truly adore My Name is Red and recommend it as a good laugh read. Have just started reading Snow. I would put Pamuk in the same scale of Italo Calvino in his ingenuity and on par with Eco in his plotting. Well, Dan Brown is a fake although he has better claims to pace and tempo in comparison with Pamuk.

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The Ambler Warning is one kitsch I managed to read (though not in one sitting) in one bated-breath in a long while. I had to labour through Archer's latest False Impressions (am tagging to Samanth's review of the book) and did not think unputdownable about Crichton's State of Fear (although is it highly recommendable as a read); thought of the allegedly legendary Da Vinci Code as inferior even to Brown's own Digital Fortress and repudiate anything by Brown as nothing more than a distant pollutant particule cousin of any of Umberto Ecos; and refused summarily to even read beyond the blurbs of the last two Cusslers and Forbes lest I get into a comatose for recognizing good reads. Ambler is apparently Ludlum's last individual novel. So they keep purporting. How many more? I mean, with a mother of mother-lode of talent such as Robert Ludlum's you need not have to pull all those sackfuls of wool to ensure sales of his works, however posthumous the publications may be. If co-authored books such as The Moscow Vector could sell, Ambler definitely will take care of its 1 millionth copy. My personal paean for The Ambler Warning is due to various factors. It is a better book than what is considered to be his best yet - The Bourne series. Subject matter is similar. An individual's quest for himself and his identity, caught in a political stabilization web. Well, finally Ludlum has conclusively taken the step other authors have made in a financial hurry: towards the Bamboo Curtain that is slowly getting the world under its slow but sure and large dragnet - China. Nice thing, Ludlum was not alive to see the Iraq operation of the US and Saddam fiasco, else he would have joined the band in wasting his time in writing umpteen journeyman fiction versions of Three Kings (in support of the movie, I must say, it is a fun watch!). But back to Ambler. For stats, it is 480+ pages. Four Parts. Sweeps the world from Langley Base in US to Hongkong to Parrish Island off US to Taiwan off China to Paris and Davos in Mitteleurope! It moves from a search for an individual's identity - not to mention his totally changed face (remember the ol' time Desmond Bagley novel in which this guy goes to sleep in England and wakes up in Oslo to discover to his horror that he's had a face-off and has to remember to drive on the wrong side, er... right side in Norway of the road?) - to a huge plot by the US to keep healthy-minded South East Asian political leaders from living and hence transforming the world to a peaceful place. Behind all these is a bunch of followers of Mr. Ashton Palmer - a once highly-tipped hier to the US Gubernatorial position and now a Professor of Politics, incognito of course! - a sort of quiet maniac who wants to do a Ramana (a-la Captain Vijayakanth in the eponymous movie) to ensure the Machtpolitik, Realpolitik and Geopolitik supremacy of the foremost upholder of democracy in the Universe - United States of America. A brilliant, at one-go, unput-downable crescendo of a finish in Part Four, spanning about 100 pages. Just Buy It. Worth its Rs. 250/- (an edition by Orion Books for Sale in Indian Sub-continent only).

26 comments:

Srini said...

Hello Sir KK,

Too much for my first and only read that.

I don't know about you but for me New Year is just a day where people tend to demarcate things. Might as well be August 29 or February 11th.

Anyhow wish you a very very pleasing welcome to 2006. And hopefully I will be edified more from your spots and blogs.:)

antickpix said...

I'm limiting this to the post on J Depp..

While he may or may not be the finest actor of his generation, he is certainly the most accessible.

The thing about Depp is that the critics love him for his (obvious) talent and off-beat choice of roles, which the fans love him for his looks and (again) performances. He also has a certain aura about him, being neither in the mold of a clean cut Brad Pitt (though Pitt himself may have changed) nor a(now borderline crazy) Tom Cruise, but someone totally different. Perhaps being to Tim Burton what De Niro was to Scorcese (once upon a time) helps.

But, IMO, Ed Norton runs him extremely close (not streets and autobahns), for he too has the ability to morph into a particular character, whether a lovelorn priest or a neo-nazi or a...umm...into the fight club guy. Norton hasn't been in the limelight for the past couple of years, and that may have hurt him.

Another couple of very fine actors (though lesser profile than Depp and Norton) are Philip Seymour Hoffman and David Thewlis, though the latter does occasionally take on 'paycheck roles'. I'd include Gary Oldman and Kenneth Branagh on that list too.

Looking forward to your blog on Jarmusch (I myself had started a Terry Gilliam appreciation post, but never got around to finishing it. Rotting as a draft somewhere)

Krishna Kumar said...

Srini thanks for reading it though. I thought they were going to be terse each a-piece. In the end, because of the space format at blogspot, they ended rolling spools of cursor.

Krishna Kumar said...

@Rajiv:

yes, i agree that about Gary Oldman. As for Branagh... sometimes he doesn't extend beyond KB the stage actor that we know him primarily as. There is an essential difference in the handling of a role in terms of the psychological response and the attendant physical manifestation, breadth and width of gestures, facial hysterics upon closeups...etc. Sometimes Branagh tends to be excessive forgetting a camera is not stage. I haven't paid much attention to Philip Hoffman. But yes, Gary Oldman is definitely nearly up there. I adore him much as I adored another actor of a not too distant generation... Malcolm McDowell. His portrayals in both Caligula and Amadeus in the titular characters were excellent.

Krishna Kumar said...

@Srini

A very warm wishes towards a good 2006 to you too!

Srini said...

Hello Sir KK,

My second read was worth my while and I am qualified only to comment on one, while on all other agenda I got superficial enlightenments.

Once again I agree with the Bard too. You set a man up for the double-bluff, as they call in cricketing jargon itself. And indeed, you were right in saying that it is not about a Saurav's dropping after 79 runs (not the prettiest of his runs I am sure), a Manjrekar's dropping after a legendary 218 versus Pakistan at Lahore or Sir Boycott's sacking after 246 runs (ugh... that was a long innings, though: he melted Eden) ... But it is a question of someone - ANYONE at all - standing up to be counted, to shed the shibboleth of hidden personal agenda... I totally agree with you...
And Mr. Sourav beware! You are not growing any younger and yes Sir KK as you said the Pindi Express might pack Ganguly early to the Hoogli...

antickpix said...

Yes, I agree that KB can be excessive (sometimes painfully so, such as Mary Shelley's Frankenstein), but for the most part, his Shakespearean adaptations have been excellent (and I'm indebted to him for personally for introducing me to the Bard. Henry V was the movie)

Yes, Malcom McDowell is also an extremely talented actor (though slightly typecast after A Clockwork Orange). It was Tom Hulce in Amadeus though, not him.

You should check out Hoffman. An extremely versatile actor. Some of the best films he's appeared in are Paul Thomas Anderson ensemble pieces, but for his acting, I'd say my favourites are 'Love Liza', 'Almost Famous' and 'Magnolia'. He's one of those guys who has flown under the radar, hardly ever headlining films, appearing in many small yet memorable roles. He is getting very strong buzz for 'Capote' right now though.

(sorry, I get all info-heavy when talking abt film)

Srini said...

Hello Sir KK,

Posted my next last night. My article on pidgins, creoles and language origins was lost. Twas an article I'd spent so much time and energy on, but then I guess somethings do happen that way... As regards this post I have nothing else to say that the "words are for someone special"...

Anand Ramamoorthy said...

Dear KK,
This post makes my longest one look like a paragraph..lol. Glad to see you in form. I must say I cannot contribute much as regards the first half of the post. However when it comes to books maybe I can hazard something.
Michael Crichton's best book till date is Sphere. State of Fear was too predictable and somehow the hero chap was not as lovable as Ian Malcolm.

Ludlum's best happns to be the Matarese Circle (I know that the Bourne series have a greater fan following). However that genre is so passe. I am at the moment reading up on relativity and maybe will post soon on something philosophical. Thanks for dropping in to my blog and leaving a great comment.

SARVAM SRIKRISHNAARPANAMASTHU!

Krishna Kumar said...

Dear Anand

I totally agree. But then, there is an ambivalence about this post. It is made up of several small blogs. And each one may make republishing difficult and to naviagate cumbersome for the visitor. Hence the idea.

I also agree about Matarese Circle. My favourite along with Rhinemann Exchange and Parsifal Mosaic (which is bulkier even by James Michener standards, I guess!). Well, Crichton... he makes a good read. I don't buy his arguments nor theses anyway. Will await your relativity post.

Srini said...

Hello Sir KK,

Created the blog for my literary pieces. Posted the piece there. The URL: www.scribbleshores.blogspot.com

Cheers!

Goodnight...

Anand Ramamoorthy said...

Dear KK,
what about our great discussion..lol?
I actually have an intuitive feeling that we'll get along well.

SARVAM SRIKRISHNAARPANAMASTHU!

eyefry said...

Johnny Depp is definitely the acting icon of this age. I still remember watching Deadman and What's Eating Gilbert Grape back to back some 8 or 10 years ago in the golden age of cable tv (I was still an impressionable adolescent then), when - and this will sound corny as hell - the whole world suddenly opened up for me. I'd only seen the usual Hollywood fare till then. Ans since, not once has he been a let-down. Even in the ill-fated Once Upon A Time In Mexico, Depp was the only redeeming factor, because he seemed to have so much fun at what he was doing. I somehow can't see Tom Cruise being so effective as Captain Jack "Keith Richards" Sparrow or Jude Law as Willy Wonka.

And as for the best actors of the last decade or so, I would probably also include Ethan Hawke, George Clooney, Benicio Del Toro and Mat Damon somewhere in the list.

Krishna Kumar said...

Bloke Vinayak... you've actually seen Deadman? Whoa... you're a man after my heart! Whoa, what a movie! I love that movie for its sheer post-modernist, deconstructivist take on Westerns! And yes... I remember Gilbert Grape... and Mexico... well, that has always been the hallmark of good actors! They enjoy their work irrespective of the crap around them. It's the internal motivation and self-accountability to excel in what you do for your own sake that pushes boundaries. And Depp deppinitely is upp there! Oh, where does Matt Damon figure here, lad? See you, anyway, hopefully in the evening.

Krishna Kumar said...

@ Anand...

yes, we shall get along well sure as St. Peter and Pearly Gates. Especially, today after I have been anointed with the title Acharya. I always go about telling some close acquaintances and loved ones of mine that my calling is in the religious direction what with a strong Kethu up my chart! For starters, today, I started working with a school where the kids are taught to call their teachers Acharya. Acharyan just an 'n' away. Hopefully in my next birth I would like to reach that elevated position, if my sins of this birth are washed away before my next! :-)) And then we really can have a proper Dvaita-Advaita-Vishishtadvaita doctrine debates. But for the moment, I have a long road to travel in my enlightenment. (Marghazi always inspires me in the theological direction!)

Krishna Kumar said...

Srini,

Shall visit the blog. Have bookmarked. Shall link it as well. All the best.

Krishna Kumar said...

And Aash... antickpix... Dada has done it again. He's a thoroughbred street fighter. Inspite of Bengal losing in the traditional way to TN, Saurav has salvaged his skin with a 3 wkts, 59, 2 wkts and 88 performance. Yaaaahooo! Now I just keep my fingers crossed as he crosses the border to Pak - his Achilles heel!

antickpix said...

"Umpire: K Hariharan instructed SC Ganguly to stop bowling after he was repeatedly found running on the protected area. The prescribed process of two warnings was followed before imposing the penalty on SC Ganguly."

Clearly the work of his enemies.

Anand Ramamoorthy said...

Dear KK,
So you became an acharya (this much close to being a full fledged Acharyan, Anand shows his thumb and index finger locked as if in a mudra). Our Acharyan once told me that in terms of the Sampradaayam, I will be the chosen one in the extended family (which is more extended than I can possibly tolerate...lol). Maybe this is another similarity between you and the solitary philosopher who rules the blog world (excuse me, but another blogger refers to me as Your Royal Highness, so I guess I am assuming that I have become the sovereign of the blog world..lol).

Also KK, Srini has knighted you (he prefixes a sir to your name in every comment in a manner that smacks off a knighthood).

btw KK, Margazhi does accentuate people towards spirituality and theology. Are you sure the major motivating factor is not a certain extremely philosophical entity known as Pongal ?..lol!

I too love Maargazhi.
I really am not very quick to accept the theory of multiple births so I guess I can't wait for your next birth. Maybe you will be enlightened (or in the mood, which seems to be more appropriate) so that we can have that debate.
Have fun KK, May Sriman Narayana be with you.

SARVAM SRIKRISHNAARPANAMASTHU!

Krishna Kumar said...

Anand

Srini's "Sir"ing me has nothing to do with knighthood. He just indicates am too old, lol! And yes, there is something about Margazhi. Ven Pongal does play a role in that I guess!

@ antickpix

well, Umpire Hariharan has been surviving the job much like a few others from Pakistan, Billy Bowden and some rank bad umpires by the grace of THE OVERALL BOARD. Have you noticed, with no irreverence to Anil Kumble, everytime Hariharan umpires, Kumble performs better. Is there a conncection, now?

Srini said...

Hello (Sir) KK,

Well age deserves its own reverence I surmise. And... I do know placing the sir before the name is quite tricky.

But then that way I never like the Indian way of saying "KK sir" of something of that sort... how will it be to say Srinivas Mr? (sound like some Tamizh film admonition by a girl friend... he he he) I believe every language has to be spoken in a certain fashion - and I have been working on something of a British tone for seven years now. And yeah... I did criticize those in Thondaiyrapet with a Texan drawl, but mind you not for their accents altogether, but for the purpose behind it and the inconsistency, which betrays them in quick time.
I love Margazhi, too, though my intellectual edifications befall in the red hot months of the equinox. My first novel - two years ago - began on the 1st day of Agni Nakshatram and ended a year later - just a coincidence - on the first day of another Agninakshatra.
Take care - maybe since you have a title now (HATS OFF!!!) better to use that - Acharya KK. Cheers. Have a great weekend

Srini said...

Hello (Sir) Acharya KK,

Posted the article on Srinath! Remember you asking about Sri and today I wanted to do something to take a break from my project, prep and academics. So compiled this one...

Perhaps, if you like a lighter read, you could read this ere you go ahead with the literature...

OOps... I am not too good at arranging in proper order titles and references

Anand Ramamoorthy said...

Dear KK,
my latest post is an attempt at fiction in a genre familiar to you..
please do read it and give me your comments.

SARVAM SRIKRISHNAARPANAMASTHU!

Krishna Kumar said...

@ Anand / Srini...

titles bother me, deeds worry me... anytime I might be levied property tax! I would rather live a tenant of hearts where it's love against lucre which is the root cause of all evil!

Srini said...

Trust me (Sir) KK,

You will live in my memory - and I myself am a man who prefers love over lucre - for a very long time to come. If there was any doubt over that, well this comment of yours removes it.

I am not a hasty man, so you can believe in that fact. And yeah... even with such a meaningful comment a casual sense of humour! Always appreciated...

eyefry said...

i thought mat damon was pretty decent in 'the talented mr.ripley'. he just needs to take on the right role, i guess.

btw, have you seen 'before sunrise' and 'before sunset'? they're each built on nearly two hours of constant unremitting dialogue between a man and a woman. they not only sustain viewer interest throughout, they maintain and nourish it. amazing stuff, brilliantly scripted. was reminded of them when we were reading 'love letters' yesterday. forgot to mention it then.